Help Scotland get smarter with smart meters

Smart Energy GB  is a campaign for the national introduction of smart meters. Every household will be offered one by the end of 2020 and it’s a priority to ensure all consumers are able to benefit from smart metering. The campaign has just launched its Smart Energy GB in Communities Fund, a grants programme seeking applications from not-for-profit organisations that can reach groups who may face barriers to getting a smart meter.

Grants of up to £10,000 are available now for groups that work directly with one or more of the priority groups.
Projects or activities must be completed by 31 December 2016.
If you are applying for a small grant, you can apply any time prior to 30 September 2016 for a decision within 4 to 8 weeks.

Click here for more information and to apply

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Plenty of opportunities for inspiration and learning through the fully funded Community Learning Exchange

Bridgend Inspiring Growth on their Community Learning Exchange in July 2016.

Bridgend Inspiring Growth on their Community Learning Exchange in July 2016.

Scotland’s community sector is very well served by networks of all shapes, sizes and specialisms but sometimes the costs of networking and learning from others can be prohibitive. Scottish Government has recognised this and has agreed funding for our Community Learning Exchange. The exchange can take different forms:

Learning Visits – These are opportunities for members of one community project to visit one or several other community projects to get inspiration, know-how, access to first-hand experience, and make valuable contacts.

Learning Journeys – These give the opportunity to invite key decision makers and influencers (MSPs, civil servants, councillors, officers etc) to visit one or more examples of ‘best practice’ to give them an insight into a particular community issue or objective.

On-going support – In depth consultations between organisations. This might be the result of a learning visit when it is recognised that more specific and on-going help, support or advice is required. This can be through face-to-face meetings, Skype, email or phone calls.

The Community Learning Exchange will cover 100% of the costs of a visit up to a limit of £750. Costs may include travel, accommodation (where appropriate), subsistence and a host fee of £300 (up to £500 where the host has multiple visitors).

Click here for more information and to apply

August newsletter

Our August newsletter is out with plenty of funding opportunities, upcoming events, and inspiring stories! You can read it here.

Get in touch if you have something you would like to feature in next month’s newsletter on info@scottishcommunitiescan.org.uk.

MAJI –a personal reflection from an International Knowledge and Learning Exchange in Malawi

Beswick, instructor at Kusamala permaculture centre explaining forest garden design

Beswick, instructor at Kusamala permaculture centre explaining forest garden design

Philip Revell, Chair of the Scottish Communities Climate Action Network (SCCAN), travelled to Malawi in March 2016 as part of an international knowledge and learning exchange. Philip learnt first hand about the climate change impacts affecting communities in Malawi. He shares his experiences below and reflects on common challenges and opportunities for SCCAN members to learn from and share experiences with communities and Malawi. First published on Adaptation Scotland’s blog.

In common with the rest of southern Africa, Malawi is already facing a significant impact from climate change. Devastating floods in January 2015 affected over 1.1 million people, 7% of the population. 280 people lost their lives and 230,000 were displaced, many permanently. Coping with a disaster on this scale was a major challenge for a country with so few resources and such limited infrastructure.

MAJI, a Bantu word for water, is a Scottish Government climate justice funded project being delivered by VSO Malawi along with a range of local partners and support from James Hutton Institute in Aberdeen. The aim of the project is to enhance the resilience of some of the poorest and most vulnerable communities through a more integrated approach to planning future water resource management and direct practical support to ‘Village Natural Resource Management Committees’.

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Become Scotland’s third Zero Waste town

Amy & Niamh (4) help Anne Shaw of Fyne Futures with the curb-side collection for the launch of Zero Waste Bute, Scotland’s second Zero Waste Town (and the world’s first Zero Waste Island). More info from Sarah Stuart, Zero Waste Scotland 07715 066461

Amy & Niamh (4) help Anne Shaw of Fyne Futures with the curb-side collection for the launch of Zero Waste Bute, Scotland’s second Zero Waste Town (and the world’s first Zero Waste Island).

Are you championing Zero Waste and have some innovative ideas burning to get implemented? Then perhaps you could follow Zero Waste Dunbar and Zero Waste Bute and become Scotland third Zero Waste town. Zero Waste Scotland are encouraging environmental projects promoting a circular economy approach to apply, and especially urban projects are urged to come forward this time round.

Applicants will be expected to provide details of innovative approaches they would take to help their communities to achieve ambitious Scottish Government national targets, including a 70% household recycling rate and a 33% reduction in wasted food by 2025. Measures to increase re-use, repair and resource efficiency should also form part of the bids. The town that’s chosen will receive funding from Zero Waste Scotland’s Resource Efficient Circular Economy Accelerator Programme to help it implement its ideas.

Click here for more information and to apply.

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